Got a Girl Crush On: Emma Kunz Born into a family of Swiss weavers in 1892, Kunz created mandala-like grids with colored pencil on graph paper that she regularly used as instruments of healing. Each diagram was reportedly drawn in a single sitting, some of which could reportedly last over 24 hours at a time. The drawings were used to help her visualize the invisible realities that exist beyond the tangible, everyday world, and were composed with the aid of a divining pendulum that allowed her to plan the ultimate structure of their geometric configurations. They operated both as documentation of research into and as conduits for patterns of vibrational energy that could be used to realign the psychic imbalances underlying her patients’ medical conditions, and thereby to cure them. She believed that art, nature, and life were all interwoven: drawing allowed her to take part in a world of forces, seize that world and orient it for an energetic sum leading to cosmic consciousness. Her pieces were never meant to be displayed on a museum wall, but to lie on the floor between Kunz and one of her patients to function as diagrams and aid to meditation for the locating of a patient’s lifeline.  (via Emma Kunz - CultureNova :karagintherleatherstudio: goldenhaze)

Got a Girl Crush On: Emma Kunz

Born into a family of Swiss weavers in 1892, Kunz created mandala-like grids with colored pencil on graph paper that she regularly used as instruments of healing. Each diagram was reportedly drawn in a single sitting, some of which could reportedly last over 24 hours at a time. The drawings were used to help her visualize the invisible realities that exist beyond the tangible, everyday world, and were composed with the aid of a divining pendulum that allowed her to plan the ultimate structure of their geometric configurations.

They operated both as documentation of research into and as conduits for patterns of vibrational energy that could be used to realign the psychic imbalances underlying her patients’ medical conditions, and thereby to cure them. She believed that art, nature, and life were all interwoven: drawing allowed her to take part in a world of forces, seize that world and orient it for an energetic sum leading to cosmic consciousness.

Her pieces were never meant to be displayed on a museum wall, but to lie on the floor between Kunz and one of her patients to function as diagrams and aid to meditation for the locating of a patient’s lifeline. 

(via Emma Kunz - CultureNova :karagintherleatherstudio: goldenhaze)