Slate Magazine: Agatha Christie’s Secret Notebooks.  
  Got a girl crush on: Agatha Christie  
 Looks  like the writing process of the mistress of mysteries Dame Agatha Christie was perplexing in  itself. From her nonlinear way of constructing the plot to her haphazard  workspace, author John Curran explores the writing methods of Christie  in his book   Agatha  Christie’s Secret Notebooks  .: 
 “What, then, could be  more shocking than to discover that the dame was no  lady? Agatha didn’t sit at a pristine desk neatly typing her novels,  Chapter 1 followed by Chapter 2, and so on, before donning gloves and  descending at 6 p.m. for a sherry. In   Agatha Christie’s Secret Notebooks  , John  Curran, a Christie expert who has trawled through 73 of the author’s  previously unread notebooks, reveals the utter derangement in Christie’s  method. Her less-than-refined writerly day began with finding her  notebook,  which surely she’d left  right there . Then, having found  a  notebook (not  the  one she’d used yesterday), and staring in  stunned amazement at the illegible chicken scratchings therein, she  would finally settle down to jab at elusive characters and oil creaky  plots. Most astonishing, Curran discovers that for all her assured  skewering of human character in a finished novel, sometimes when  Christie started her books, even  she  didn’t know who the  murderer was. Ah! It makes sense—a brilliant mystery writer must first  experience the mystery! Or does it” 
 (via  kottke.org )

Slate Magazine: Agatha Christie’s Secret Notebooks.

Got a girl crush on: Agatha Christie

Looks like the writing process of the mistress of mysteries Dame Agatha Christie was perplexing in itself. From her nonlinear way of constructing the plot to her haphazard workspace, author John Curran explores the writing methods of Christie in his book Agatha Christie’s Secret Notebooks.:

“What, then, could be more shocking than to discover that the dame was no lady? Agatha didn’t sit at a pristine desk neatly typing her novels, Chapter 1 followed by Chapter 2, and so on, before donning gloves and descending at 6 p.m. for a sherry. In Agatha Christie’s Secret Notebooks, John Curran, a Christie expert who has trawled through 73 of the author’s previously unread notebooks, reveals the utter derangement in Christie’s method. Her less-than-refined writerly day began with finding her notebook, which surely she’d left right there. Then, having found a notebook (not the one she’d used yesterday), and staring in stunned amazement at the illegible chicken scratchings therein, she would finally settle down to jab at elusive characters and oil creaky plots. Most astonishing, Curran discovers that for all her assured skewering of human character in a finished novel, sometimes when Christie started her books, even she didn’t know who the murderer was. Ah! It makes sense—a brilliant mystery writer must first experience the mystery! Or does it”

(via kottke.org)