A publication about the women who
do amazing things – right in our own backyards.

Got A Girl Crush On: These Pizza-Loving “Suffragettes”
We have far too much love for this photo/caption to ruin it  with a little fact-checking. Thank you, brave women, for paving the way for what is (quite literally) every weekend of our lives.

“In 1921, early suffragettes often donned a bathing suit and ate pizza in large groups to annoy men…it was a custom at the time”

(via Cult of Aphrodite Vintaga: rookiemag: fat-grrrl-activism)

Got A Girl Crush On: These Pizza-Loving “Suffragettes”

We have far too much love for this photo/caption to ruin it  with a little fact-checking. Thank you, brave women, for paving the way for what is (quite literally) every weekend of our lives.

“In 1921, early suffragettes often donned a bathing suit and ate pizza in large groups to annoy men…it was a custom at the time”

(via Cult of Aphrodite Vintaga: rookiemagfat-grrrl-activism)

Got A Girl Crush Obsession On: The Forgotten Lumberjills of WWII
Like the many other amazing heroines of their time, the ladies of the Women’s Timber Corps, aka the Lumberjills, stepped into unconventional britches in order to keep the industry, and country, moving while the men were off at war. Of course, there were also some major stereotypes which had to chopped down along the way:


They faced prejudice from the male forestry workers, as this was pure manual labor and they weren’t expected to be tough enough. Needless to say, they proved them wrong. Their hands became calloused, they developed strong muscular arms and legs - not traits of a “real lady" at the time, but they relished the freedom and fresh air even if it did cause many aches and pains! I can imagine that many were unwilling or uncomfortable to return to indoor-domestic lives IF their husbands returned. For those who joined when young, or if widowed and having to start afresh, I believe it gave them a strong core confidence, and the toughness to go on alone.


Seriously, though. When someone inevitably makes a movie out of this, will someone please get a hold of me? I’ll need to raid the wardrobe.
Read more about the Lumberjills here!

Got A Girl Crush Obsession On: The Forgotten Lumberjills of WWII

Like the many other amazing heroines of their time, the ladies of the Women’s Timber Corps, aka the Lumberjills, stepped into unconventional britches in order to keep the industry, and country, moving while the men were off at war. Of course, there were also some major stereotypes which had to chopped down along the way:

They faced prejudice from the male forestry workers, as this was pure manual labor and they weren’t expected to be tough enough. Needless to say, they proved them wrong. Their hands became calloused, they developed strong muscular arms and legs - not traits of a “real lady" at the time, but they relished the freedom and fresh air even if it did cause many aches and pains! I can imagine that many were unwilling or uncomfortable to return to indoor-domestic lives IF their husbands returned. For those who joined when young, or if widowed and having to start afresh, I believe it gave them a strong core confidence, and the toughness to go on alone.

Seriously, though. When someone inevitably makes a movie out of this, will someone please get a hold of me? I’ll need to raid the wardrobe.

Read more about the Lumberjills here!

Got a Girl Crush On: Archival photographs of women’s athletics from the University of Chicago


While The Archival Photographic Files of the University of Chicago offer an intriguing, general overview of the college campus in development, we couldn’t help but linger specifically over the section on women’s athletics. More than a just-for-fun slice of “now and then”-style Americana, the images are a reminder that women who defy stereotypes in order to pursue their passions are, more often than not, exactly like you and me: everyday ladies simply doing their thing. And we think that is really, really cool. 

Got a Girl Crush On: New fave tumblr, Sassyscans

Too, too good!
(via bbook)
Got a Girl Crush On: SLEEPING BEAUTY’S PARIS APARTMENT DISCOVERED


A woman left her apartment in Paris completely untouched after World War II but still paid the rent up until she died in 2010 - after she died, the apartment was unlocked. It’s like a time capsule.

(via dontwhistleontheelevator)

Got a Girl Crush On: SLEEPING BEAUTY’S PARIS APARTMENT DISCOVERED

A woman left her apartment in Paris completely untouched after World War II but still paid the rent up until she died in 2010 - after she died, the apartment was unlocked. It’s like a time capsule.

(via dontwhistleontheelevator)

Got a Girl Crush On: Wild Hearts Can’t Be Broken (1991)

Do you REMEMBER this movie?!

I remember begging my mom to rent and re-rent the VHS copy of this from our local video store (or it might’ve been the library—whichever I’m sure I wore their copy out!). Running away from home! Horses! The Circus! Pugnacity and determination! Overcoming adversity! This was every little girl’s fantasy. Sonora was a certified badass.

Based on the real-life story of Sonora Webster Carver, the first female to ride diving horses at the Steel Pier in Atlantic City (in 1924 she made history when she dove 40 feet on horseback into a tank of water) In 1931 she went blind from detached retinas after one of her horses hit the water off-balance, yet she she still continued to ride the high-diving horses until World War II. 

Once released, she listened to the movie but had this to say about it:

The movie made a big deal about having the courage to go on riding after she lost her sight. But, the truth was riding the horse was the most fun you could have and we just loved it so.

P.S. it’s streaming for free here!

(top 2: movie stills; bottom 3: real life Sonora)

Henrietta Everlasting: 1950s Cells Still Alive, Helping Science
Got a girl crush on: Henrietta Lacks
In 1951, Lacks died of cervical cancer at John Hopkins Hospital. Unbeknownst to her, the cells from her biopsy were made available to biological researchers and had the unique ability to be kept alive and grow. To this day, her cell line, known as HeLA, is still growing and multiplying in laboratories across the world. Countless medical discoveries have been made because of it, including the vaccine for polio, AIDS research and cancer research (click on image above to see). Since her death, scientists have grown 20 tons of her cells—that’s 400x her original weight!
If this sounds interesting to you, you can watch this hour-long BBC documentary online: Modern Times: The Way of All Flesh. The Radiolab episode on Tumors also features a segment on Lacks, HeLA, and the controversy with her family (Thanks to Monica for the reminder!). 
Henrietta, you keep on keepin’ on!
(via Wired Magazine)

Henrietta Everlasting: 1950s Cells Still Alive, Helping Science

Got a girl crush on: Henrietta Lacks

In 1951, Lacks died of cervical cancer at John Hopkins Hospital. Unbeknownst to her, the cells from her biopsy were made available to biological researchers and had the unique ability to be kept alive and grow. To this day, her cell line, known as HeLA, is still growing and multiplying in laboratories across the world. Countless medical discoveries have been made because of it, including the vaccine for polio, AIDS research and cancer research (click on image above to see). Since her death, scientists have grown 20 tons of her cells—that’s 400x her original weight!

If this sounds interesting to you, you can watch this hour-long BBC documentary online: Modern Times: The Way of All Flesh. The Radiolab episode on Tumors also features a segment on Lacks, HeLA, and the controversy with her family (Thanks to Monica for the reminder!). 

Henrietta, you keep on keepin’ on!

(via Wired Magazine)

Tagged: #history
Got a girl crush on: WAVES (Women Accepted for Volunteer Emergency Service)
A Continuous Lean has got a great photo piece on (chambray clad) female sailors in WWII. In 1942, the US Navy made an unprecedented move and recruited over 27,000 women to be officers in the WAVES (Women Accepted for Volunteer Emergency Service) division. These women were assigned the same ranks, ratings, and even the same pay as male personnel. 

See also: WASP (Women Airforce Service Pilots)

Got a girl crush on: WAVES (Women Accepted for Volunteer Emergency Service)

A Continuous Lean has got a great photo piece on (chambray clad) female sailors in WWII. In 1942, the US Navy made an unprecedented move and recruited over 27,000 women to be officers in the WAVES (Women Accepted for Volunteer Emergency Service) division. These women were assigned the same ranks, ratings, and even the same pay as male personnel. 

See also: WASP (Women Airforce Service Pilots)

“WASP (from left) Frances Green, Margaret Kirchner, Ann Waldner and Blanche Osborn leave their B-17, called Pistol Packin’ Mama, during ferry training at Lockbourne Army Air Force base in Ohio. They’re carrying their parachutes.”
Got a girl crush on: WASP (Women Airforce Service Pilots)
Amelia Earhart wasn’t the only fly girl. Check out this story on Female WWII pilots over at NPR.
(via winesburgohio)

WASP (from left) Frances Green, Margaret Kirchner, Ann Waldner and Blanche Osborn leave their B-17, called Pistol Packin’ Mama, during ferry training at Lockbourne Army Air Force base in Ohio. They’re carrying their parachutes.”

Got a girl crush on: WASP (Women Airforce Service Pilots)

Amelia Earhart wasn’t the only fly girl. Check out this story on Female WWII pilots over at NPR.

(via winesburgohio)