A publication about the women who
do amazing things – right in our own backyards.

Got a Girl Crush On: former child stars who put acting on hold for science & math

Danica McKellar played Winnie Cooper in the television show The Wonder Years, and went onto write four non-fiction books: Math Doesn’t SuckKiss My MathHot X: Algebra Exposed and Girls Get Curves: Geometry Takes Shape, which encourage middle-school and high-school girls to have confidence and succeed in math. Currently Danica hosts a fun mathy show on Nerdist’s YouTube channel called Math Bites!

Mayim Bialik will forever be known  as sunflower-adorned quirky teen on the 90s tv show, Blossom (and now on the nerd-themed show, The Big Bang Theory). But in 2007 Bialik obtained her Ph.D. for her dissertation in an investigation of hypothalamic activity in patients with Prader-Willi syndrome.

Natalie Portman was only 13 when she first debuted in The Professional, and she shot Star Wars Episode I while still in high school. As a student, Portman co-authored two research papers that were published in scientific journals. Her 1998 high school paper, “A Simple Method to Demonstrate the Enzymatic Production of Hydrogen from Sugar,” co-authored with scientists Ian Hurley and Jonathan Woodward, was entered in the Intel Science Talent Search. In 2002, she contributed to a study on memory called “Frontal lobe activation during object permanence: data from near-infrared spectroscopy” during her psychology studies at Harvard. But, being smart certainly doesn’t affect your sense of humor.

[sources: wiki]

Got a Girl Crush On: Humorist and science writer, Mary Roach (“10 things you didn’t know about orgasm,” excerpt from her amazing TED Talk which you can watch on Netflix)

We Need Your Help! Since the beginning, we wanted Got a Girl Crush Magazine to be an advertising-free publication, which is why we’ve created a Kickstarter to help bring it to print

What’s in Issue #3? We’re working on this issue as we speak and hope to launch it in April 2014. We’ve got some great interviews, essays & articles lined up. 

Here’s who you’ll find in Issue #3:

Spread the word and chip in what you canevery bit helps and we’ve got some awesome rewards too!

Got a Girl Crush On: Elise Andrew from I F*cking Love Science!

With 6.8 million followers, Andrew wields an influence over the science and fans-of-science communities. However, Andrew, 24, isn’t a scientist. She’s actually kind of a fangirl herself.
Andrew, 24, isn’t a scientist. She’s actually kind of a fangirl herself.
"I don’t really understand why people are so interested in me, personally," she told me in the back of the theater before her panel. "I’m just a curator. I’m just telling people things I think are cool."

Science is cool! And Elise keeps learnin fresh with this must-follow Facebook page.
And gotta love her for callin’ out the haters, too:

(via mashable)

Got a Girl Crush On: Elise Andrew from I F*cking Love Science!

With 6.8 million followers, Andrew wields an influence over the science and fans-of-science communities. However, Andrew, 24, isn’t a scientist. She’s actually kind of a fangirl herself.

Andrew, 24, isn’t a scientist. She’s actually kind of a fangirl herself.

"I don’t really understand why people are so interested in me, personally," she told me in the back of the theater before her panel. "I’m just a curator. I’m just telling people things I think are cool."

Science is cool! And Elise keeps learnin fresh with this must-follow Facebook page.

And gotta love her for callin’ out the haters, too:

(via mashable)


Got a Girl Crush On: Emma Kunz

Born into a family of Swiss weavers in 1892, Kunz created mandala-like grids with colored pencil on graph paper that she regularly used as instruments of healing. Each diagram was reportedly drawn in a single sitting, some of which could reportedly last over 24 hours at a time. The drawings were used to help her visualize the invisible realities that exist beyond the tangible, everyday world, and were composed with the aid of a divining pendulum that allowed her to plan the ultimate structure of their geometric configurations.



They operated both as documentation of research into and as conduits for patterns of vibrational energy that could be used to realign the psychic imbalances underlying her patients’ medical conditions, and thereby to cure them. She believed that art, nature, and life were all interwoven: drawing allowed her to take part in a world of forces, seize that world and orient it for an energetic sum leading to cosmic consciousness.Her pieces were never meant to be displayed on a museum wall, but to lie on the floor between Kunz and one of her patients to function as diagrams and aid to meditation for the locating of a patient’s lifeline. 




(via Emma Kunz - CultureNova :karagintherleatherstudio: goldenhaze)

Got a Girl Crush On: Emma Kunz

Born into a family of Swiss weavers in 1892, Kunz created mandala-like grids with colored pencil on graph paper that she regularly used as instruments of healing. Each diagram was reportedly drawn in a single sitting, some of which could reportedly last over 24 hours at a time. The drawings were used to help her visualize the invisible realities that exist beyond the tangible, everyday world, and were composed with the aid of a divining pendulum that allowed her to plan the ultimate structure of their geometric configurations.

They operated both as documentation of research into and as conduits for patterns of vibrational energy that could be used to realign the psychic imbalances underlying her patients’ medical conditions, and thereby to cure them. She believed that art, nature, and life were all interwoven: drawing allowed her to take part in a world of forces, seize that world and orient it for an energetic sum leading to cosmic consciousness.

Her pieces were never meant to be displayed on a museum wall, but to lie on the floor between Kunz and one of her patients to function as diagrams and aid to meditation for the locating of a patient’s lifeline. 

(via Emma Kunz - CultureNova :karagintherleatherstudio: goldenhaze)

Got a Girl Crush On: A Urine Powered Generator designed by four teenage girls in Africa

An amazing accomplishment by four brilliant girls. The girls are are Duro-Aina Adebola (14), Akindele Abiola (14), Faleke Oluwatoyin (14) and Bello Eniola (15).

1 Liter of urine gives you 6 hours of electricity.

The system works like this:

  • Urine is put into an electrolytic cell, which separates out the hydrogen.
  • The hydrogen goes into a water filter for purification, which then gets pushed into the gas cylinder.
  • The gas cylinder pushes hydrogen into a cylinder of liquid borax, which is used to remove the moisture from the hydrogen gas.
  • This purified hydrogen gas is pushed into the generator.

(via thefontnazijapesofwrathhowiviewafrica)

Got a Girl Crush On: “I Am a Scientist” (Mates of State cover Guided by Voices to promote girls in science)

The problems are clear. Science and technology fields hold the jobs of the future, but our young women aren’t being prepared effectively to lead, or even compete. Interest in science is equal among younger girls and boys, and then diverges from middle school onward. There’s many culprits to blame, and most of them are social.

So again we ask: How do we fix it?

There’s wrong ways. And then there’s really wrong ways, like last week’s “Science, It’s A Girl Thing” fiasco. You don’t encourage girls in science by creating unrealistic role models and more stereotypes. That’s why I love the soon-to-be-released Science Fair album, especially this track from Mates of State.

To me, it captures all the right stuff. The happy curiosity, the proud young girl working on what makes her happy, and getting to prove the naysayers wrong in the end. The full album features tracks that serve to inspire young girls in education, all performed by female singers, and all of the proceeds will go to girls’ STEM programs through Girls, Inc..

If you’d like more information on the Science Fair album, check out their website. 

directed by Lindsay Van Dyke

(via tinyparticlesjtotheizzoe)

Got a Girl Crush On: Ms. Frizzle’s dress game

You may remember this gregarious ginger as the super awesome science teacher from the Magic Schoolbus book series—but I remember her for her always appropriately coordinated ensembles. And The Carbon Magazine has a great “how to wear” guide to the Frizz, galaxy style!