A publication about the women who
do amazing things – right in our own backyards.

Got a Girl Crush On: The Inspired Women of LA

Inspired Women of Los Angeles connects creatives for conscious exploration & collaboration in the arts by hosting exclusive meet-ups, work-shops, parties & a members only network & directory. 

We’re inspired by these ladies who, much in the same vein of this blog (and magazine), works to bridge and support women in their community directly. We think this is a great example for other women to start similar lady tribes in their own towns!

Photographs of their one year anniversary meet-up by IWLA founder Megan Kathleen McIsaac.

(via inspiredwomenofla)

Got a Girl Crush On: GAGC Issue #1 alumna, Jenny Slate in Obvious Child.

Obvious Child is a without apologies and unlikely romantic comedy written and directed by a woman, and about a woman seeking to get an abortion. This movie, while at times may be slightly forced, is important. Before some of you may write this off as liberal pro-choice propaganda, I urge you to see it. It’s crass, it’s emotional, it’s funny.

"We made the feature in response to a bunch of romantic comedies that were about unplanned pregnancy and ended in childbirth,” she explains. “I liked Knocked Up a lot, and I liked Juno and Waitress. But they are the reason why we made this movie as a reaction.”

The choice to terminate a pregnancy is rarely shown anywhere in our culture, she continues: “Especially in movies, they never let the woman make the other choice — or even say the word ‘abortion.’” (—Director Gillian Robespierre)

For more, check out Fresh Air interview with director Gillian Robespierre & Jenny Slate with Terry Gross

Got a Girl Crush On: The student who spoke out against her school’s newly instated dress codes

To be 15 and this aware of the limitations only imposed on women, needs a round of applause. We need to stop teaching young women they need to change themselves and how they dress for men.

Can anyone site the origin of the school and the amazing lady who made these?

(via cabellharrysflaccidcock)

Got a Girl Crush On: Adren Wray’s photos of creatives project, Boots & Pine

"I am inspired by those who use dress as a vehicle for creative expression and for serious fun. Boots & Pine started with my love of people watching and of style, and is growing into something bigger and better than I could’ve imagined. I’ve loved getting to meet and befriend so many wonderful people, and I hope to continue growing this project into the future."

Peep her gorgeous portraits over on Boots & Pine (and check out the rest of her photography, too!)

Got a Girl Crush On: Women in the Band

The history of the all-girl bands and the talented female jazz and big band instrumentalists who continue to struggle for recognition in a man’s world. 

This looks amazing!

(via meredith)

Got A Girl Crush Obsession On: The Forgotten Lumberjills of WWII
Like the many other amazing heroines of their time, the ladies of the Women’s Timber Corps, aka the Lumberjills, stepped into unconventional britches in order to keep the industry, and country, moving while the men were off at war. Of course, there were also some major stereotypes which had to chopped down along the way:


They faced prejudice from the male forestry workers, as this was pure manual labor and they weren’t expected to be tough enough. Needless to say, they proved them wrong. Their hands became calloused, they developed strong muscular arms and legs - not traits of a “real lady" at the time, but they relished the freedom and fresh air even if it did cause many aches and pains! I can imagine that many were unwilling or uncomfortable to return to indoor-domestic lives IF their husbands returned. For those who joined when young, or if widowed and having to start afresh, I believe it gave them a strong core confidence, and the toughness to go on alone.


Seriously, though. When someone inevitably makes a movie out of this, will someone please get a hold of me? I’ll need to raid the wardrobe.
Read more about the Lumberjills here!

Got A Girl Crush Obsession On: The Forgotten Lumberjills of WWII

Like the many other amazing heroines of their time, the ladies of the Women’s Timber Corps, aka the Lumberjills, stepped into unconventional britches in order to keep the industry, and country, moving while the men were off at war. Of course, there were also some major stereotypes which had to chopped down along the way:

They faced prejudice from the male forestry workers, as this was pure manual labor and they weren’t expected to be tough enough. Needless to say, they proved them wrong. Their hands became calloused, they developed strong muscular arms and legs - not traits of a “real lady" at the time, but they relished the freedom and fresh air even if it did cause many aches and pains! I can imagine that many were unwilling or uncomfortable to return to indoor-domestic lives IF their husbands returned. For those who joined when young, or if widowed and having to start afresh, I believe it gave them a strong core confidence, and the toughness to go on alone.

Seriously, though. When someone inevitably makes a movie out of this, will someone please get a hold of me? I’ll need to raid the wardrobe.

Read more about the Lumberjills here!


This interview is a repost from our new sister-swap site, Sadie Magazine!

Smells Like TEEN Spirit Written by Cassie J. SneiderPhotos by Jason RodgersHair and Makeup by Ahbi Nishman
Voted one of the “11 Great Bands You Don’t Know (But Should)” by Time magazine last year, TEEN is hardly the bubblegum girl group you’d expect from their band name. TEEN was formed in 2010 by Teeny Lieberson, formerly of Here We Go Magic, when she rallied her sisters Katherine and Lizzie and their friend Jane Herships to form a lo-fi pop group whose sound ranges from dance-punk jams to psychedelic, hypnotic tracks reminiscent of another era.
The band dropped their digital-only EP Little Doods in 2011, but it was the release and emphatically positive reviews of their debut album In Limbothat really put TEEN on the map this August. They are currently in the middle of a national tour, which included a recent show in New York with Ariel Pink. Teeny took a few minutes to chat with Cassie J. Sneider via email about what’s up and what’s next.


Cassie: How did you all meet?

Teeny: We’re sisters and we met Jane by playing in a band called Amazing Baby.Cassie: What was the first record, tape, or CD you ever got?
I have been actually quite shocked and disappointed in the amount of misogyny that still exists. It feels a little passé to be quite frank. 
Teeny: TLC’s Ooooooohhh…On the TLC Tip or the Beatles Anthology. The blue one. Cassie: How does being an actual signed rock star in the year 2012 compare to the rock star dream a lot of us grew up believing in? (The one where a guy with a cigar and a ponytail says, “Kid, you got what it takes!” then hands you a contract, and the next day a dump truck delivers cash and babes to your door.)
Teeny: I think that might still happen for some people, but not us. YET. Record number three. Cassie: As a band of awesome women, what sort of challenges has gender presented? And how do you combat creepy dudes at shows?Teeny: Luckily, we haven’t really encountered too many creepy dudes. They have been pretty awesome. But with press and blogs, I definitely had to stop reading comments because some of the feedback is so negative, and it was always about the way we looked and not about the music. Going into this project I was aware of the fact that women in the public eye have do deal with this all the time. But experiencing it, I have been actually quite shocked and disappointed in the amount of misogyny that still exists. It feels a little passé to be quite frank. 
Cassie: What was your Plan B if you hadn’t made it in music? Farmer? Neuroscientist? Dental hygienist?Teeny: I wish I could say there’s a Plan B, but there’s not. I would consider farming though.Cassie: OK, so there’s a van accident on tour. Everybody lives, but each of you is melted to one other person in the band. Who do you choose to be conjoined to, and what sort of mutant ability will this bandmate bring to the table?Teeny: Jane so she can cook us beef stew. 


Cassie: What can we expect from TEEN in the future? And what’s going to happen in your episode of VH1 Behind the Music?Teeny: The future: more records, loads of touring. Behind the Music: Everyone will be happily married and pregnant, and I will be a hermit living in the woods building synths. 

This interview is a repost from our new sister-swap site, Sadie Magazine!

Smells Like TEEN Spirit
Written by Cassie J. Sneider
Photos by Jason Rodgers
Hair and Makeup by Ahbi Nishman

Voted one of the “11 Great Bands You Don’t Know (But Should)” by Time magazine last year, TEEN is hardly the bubblegum girl group you’d expect from their band name. TEEN was formed in 2010 by Teeny Lieberson, formerly of Here We Go Magic, when she rallied her sisters Katherine and Lizzie and their friend Jane Herships to form a lo-fi pop group whose sound ranges from dance-punk jams to psychedelic, hypnotic tracks reminiscent of another era.

The band dropped their digital-only EP Little Doods in 2011, but it was the release and emphatically positive reviews of their debut album In Limbothat really put TEEN on the map this August. They are currently in the middle of a national tour, which included a recent show in New York with Ariel Pink. Teeny took a few minutes to chat with Cassie J. Sneider via email about what’s up and what’s next.

Cassie: How did you all meet?

Teeny: We’re sisters and we met Jane by playing in a band called Amazing Baby.

Cassie: What was the first record, tape, or CD you ever got?

I have been actually quite shocked and disappointed in the amount of misogyny that still exists. It feels a little passé to be quite frank. 

Teeny: TLC’s Ooooooohhh…On the TLC Tip or the Beatles Anthology. The blue one. 

Cassie: How does being an actual signed rock star in the year 2012 compare to the rock star dream a lot of us grew up believing in? (The one where a guy with a cigar and a ponytail says, “Kid, you got what it takes!” then hands you a contract, and the next day a dump truck delivers cash and babes to your door.)

Teeny: I think that might still happen for some people, but not us. YET. Record number three. 

Cassie: As a band of awesome women, what sort of challenges has gender presented? And how do you combat creepy dudes at shows?

Teeny: Luckily, we haven’t really encountered too many creepy dudes. They have been pretty awesome. But with press and blogs, I definitely had to stop reading comments because some of the feedback is so negative, and it was always about the way we looked and not about the music. Going into this project I was aware of the fact that women in the public eye have do deal with this all the time. But experiencing it, I have been actually quite shocked and disappointed in the amount of misogyny that still exists. It feels a little passé to be quite frank. 

Cassie: What was your Plan B if you hadn’t made it in music? Farmer? Neuroscientist? Dental hygienist?

TeenyI wish I could say there’s a Plan B, but there’s not. I would consider farming though.

Cassie: OK, so there’s a van accident on tour. Everybody lives, but each of you is melted to one other person in the band. Who do you choose to be conjoined to, and what sort of mutant ability will this bandmate bring to the table?

Teeny: Jane so she can cook us beef stew. 
Cassie: What can we expect from TEEN in the future? And what’s going to happen in your episode of VH1 Behind the Music?

Teeny: The future: more records, loads of touring. Behind the Music: Everyone will be happily married and pregnant, and I will be a hermit living in the woods building synths. 

Got A Girl Crush On: Bolivia’s Female Wrestlers, Cholitas Luchadores

The fighting cholitas see themselves as symbols of strength: Their opponents include bigotry and sexism. “My goal,” says one fighter, “is to lift up indigenous women, who have been treated with contempt.”

“We fighters carry within us a kind of fire that nothing can quench.”

I’ve always had a crush Bolivian women and their millinery choices. Combine those hats with my love for some good old-fashion, jumping-of-the-ropes wrestling and you’ve one my heart.

Got a Girl Crush On: “I Am a Scientist” (Mates of State cover Guided by Voices to promote girls in science)

The problems are clear. Science and technology fields hold the jobs of the future, but our young women aren’t being prepared effectively to lead, or even compete. Interest in science is equal among younger girls and boys, and then diverges from middle school onward. There’s many culprits to blame, and most of them are social.

So again we ask: How do we fix it?

There’s wrong ways. And then there’s really wrong ways, like last week’s “Science, It’s A Girl Thing” fiasco. You don’t encourage girls in science by creating unrealistic role models and more stereotypes. That’s why I love the soon-to-be-released Science Fair album, especially this track from Mates of State.

To me, it captures all the right stuff. The happy curiosity, the proud young girl working on what makes her happy, and getting to prove the naysayers wrong in the end. The full album features tracks that serve to inspire young girls in education, all performed by female singers, and all of the proceeds will go to girls’ STEM programs through Girls, Inc..

If you’d like more information on the Science Fair album, check out their website. 

directed by Lindsay Van Dyke

(via tinyparticlesjtotheizzoe)